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How to Write a Professional Bio for a WriterWriters are good at writing, but they aren’t always good at marketing. But there’s one piece of marketing that no author can ignore: a good short professional bio.

You’d think that writing a bio would be easy for a writer. However, writing great mysteries doesn’t necessarily translate into creating a gripping author bio. And bottom line: most of us dread writing about ourselves.

What to put in? What to leave out? How to sound good without sounding like a braggart? No wonder so many writers procrastinate on writing their professional bio.

But you’re reading this because you’ve decided that today’s the day. Hurrah! Good for you.

OK, let’s get started writing a good author bio for you. Here is what you need to keep in mind:

1. Be very clear about your target audience.

“Target audience” is just a fancy way of saying “people who read your work.” Consider who typically reads your work (or who your work is intended to attract) and tailor your bio to their interests. After all, while an author bio may lead a reader to a new favorite writer, in many cases, the author bio is to give readers who already stumbled over the work a better idea of who the author is (and hopefully make them fans for life).

2. Create mystique.

If the customer is looking for someone to put new brakes on a car, they want the most honest, straightforward, boring but qualified person alive.

But when it comes to learning about an author, a bit of mystique can be intriguing. One of the techniques of many successful authors is that they make themselves are a character in the novel that is their life.

Think of Hemingway. Would he be Hemingway if he’d been some little pipsqueak with spectacles living in an attic apartment in Dayton?

A contemporary example would be author Anne Rice, who’s created a series of bestselling vampire novels. She lives in a huge, spooky-looking mansion in New Orleans and seldom appears in public unless she’s dressed completely in black. That’s mystique.

Mystique can certainly attract fans. Once you’ve attracted their attention, your quality writing will make them a committed fan.

3. The point is still the work.

Yes, you want an interesting author bio, but the whole point of that is to make sure readers know what you’ve written, especially if you’ve got a half-dozen books out there.

Make sure to include a complete list of your published works and any works that is about to be published. Note that the phrase “about to be published” should only be used if you have an actual publishing deal (it doesn’t mean you’re hoping a publisher will buy it.)

4. You may need more than one bio.

You definitely want a “user-friendly” bio on your website (if you don’t have a website, get one). That bio is for fans and potential fans. You may need a far more formal bio to accompany a manuscript that’s being submitted to an agent or publisher, so have a couple of versions of your bio ready.

5. When in doubt, leave it out

Edit your bio just like you edit your prose. Interesting facts about your life, especially if they tie into your writing, are fine. If you lived in Paris from ages 8 to 14 and have now written a book on going to a French elementary school, that’s absolutely relevant. If you had two years of high school French classes but your book is set in Japan, leave out your knowledge of le français.

6. Tailor publication credits to your stage of career

If you’re starting out, list all your publication credits. However, by the time you’re a finalist for a National Book Award, it’s time to leave out the poem that was published in your college literary journal.

7. Don’t share too much

Again, if you’re starting out, you’d probably be delighted to hear from your fans. Heck, you might be delighted to have one of them stop by and sleep on your couch for a week!

However, believe it or not, that will change. There are lots of wonderful people in the world. There are also some really messed-up individuals out there. Don’t give them your address, your phone number, or your private email. If you want to hear from them, set up a website and let them reach you there.

8. Include a professional photo

To photo or not to photo? Between privacy concerns and the fact that most of us hate how we look in photos, you may be tempted not to include one.

However, you need a picture with your bio. It doesn’t have to contain details that will let people stalk you; a head and shoulders shot in front of a simple background is most appropriate.

It doesn’t have to cost a lot. There are photographers everywhere who can create a head-shot for a very reasonable fee. Do it. It makes you feel like a “real” author.

9. Determine the correct voice

Traditionally, professional biographies were written in the third person voice (i.e. “Doug Miller is the author of…” not “I am the author of…”).  Third-person voice conveys formality and professionalism (it sounds as if someone else is extolling your accomplishments), while first-person voice sounds friendly and informal.

The tradition of always using third-person voice for writing a professional bio has changed. With the advent of social media, the choice of how formal or informal depends on your audience and where the bio is to be published.

For example, third-person voice is most appropriate for LinkedIn because it is a business and career oriented site.  In contrast, first-person voice is often used when writing a short bio for less formal social media platforms such as a bio for Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

10. Keep it up-to-date

Your bio should be updated frequently, especially every time you have another work published or win an award.

Short Author Bio Example

____________(author’s name) is a writer, __________, and _______ (add a couple of other major interests, especially if they pertain to the written work). He/she is the author of _____(number of works), including the ___________(name of award)-winning _____________, the recently released ____________, and the upcoming _____ .   ____________ (author’s name) has also collaborated with ________ on a series of novels set in ______, available through ________ publishers. _____________ lives in ________ with his/her collection of ___________. You can reach ______________ at his/her website _____________.

Bottom Line

An author bio helps create buzz, connect with fans, establish the writer in the fraternity of authors and (hopefully) sell books as well. It’s an easy and effective tool that only requires a keyboard and bit of imagination, which you certainly have.

If you like the template above you can get a longer, more thorough version. Immediately download the full writer-author bio template that will make the job so much quicker and easier. That way you can complete your bio writing task and get back to the writing that you actually enjoy!

How to write a motivational speaker biography You’ve finished writing your article and are ready to send it off, but there’s one last task: writing an author bio. It’s hard to know exactly how to write an author bio, even if you’re a writer. So many things to say and so few words allowed in the author box! How do you decide what to focus on and which URLs to link to?

Here are some points to consider when writing an “about the author” box.

1) Decide on the purpose of the article. Is it to get people to view you as an expert? Then make sure your author box highlights your most impressive relevant qualifications. Do you also want them to go to your website? Then be sure to include a link to the exact page you want them to land on.

2) Prepare several versions of your bio in different lengths, so you can have them on hand for various uses. The “about the author” box at the end of an online article is generally two or three brief sentences (or 50 to 100 words). However, your author blurb in a newspaper or magazine might only be a few words such as “Sally Smith is an Ottawa based gardening writer”, followed by your email address. An author bio in a query letter for a book proposal would also be no more than 100 words. You can include a longer bio when you write your website biography.

3) Decide on the points you want to include. Most authors find that they have more information than they need. Be ruthless in editing your bio to include only points that are relevant. Does your fishing hobby provide good background for a murder mystery novel you are submitting to a publisher? Probably not. You worked in a coroner’s office for a couple of weeks to learn about medical examiner’s terminology? Now that’s relevant!

4) Make a list of writing credits to highlight, but confine yourself to three or else it will take up too much space.

5) Include contact information and a website so readers can learn more about you and your writing.

6) An author bio plays an important role because it communicates who you are. In the same way that a business card introduces you, a bio serves as a short introduction to your writing. Take the time to think carefully about what you want readers to remember when they hear your name.

7) Readers like to know about you. Biographical information such as marital status, number of children, pets and hobbies show that you are a normal person and helps readers relate to you.

8) Reflect your unique writing style in your author bio. Your bio provides an opportunity to give readers a sense of what to expect from your writing. Reflect the content and style of your work in how you write your author bio. For example, if you’re a humorous or satirical writer, include some humor in your bio. If you’re an academic writer, take an academic approach. The tone you take in writing your bio creates expectation of your written work.

Here are two contrasting examples of how to write an author bio to create an expectation of your writing style:

Norman Langford grew up spying on the neighbours and taking notes in a little black book. No surprise that he ended up writing spy novels!

Dr. Laura Smith has been writing on gender studies for over 20 years. Her research interests include mothering, gender roles and media representation of women.

Consider Using a Template

There’s no need to reinvent the wheel. We have a fill-in-the-blanks author bio template that will help you write a great bio. That way you can complete your bio writing task and get back to the writing that you actually enjoy!

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